Alcohol – the truth about it

Excessive consumption of alcohol

It is true that Alcohol is usually considered to be a legal drug around the world but do you know that the usage of it beyond healthy limits can make a serious toll on your health?It is true that Alcohol is usually considered to be a legal drug around the world but do you know that the usage of it beyond healthy limits can make a serious toll on your health?In fact, a glass of Alcohol per day might not cause a big harm but getting addicted to it in a daily basis, most of the time associated with heavy consumption can ultimately result in a dangerous cumulative effect on your overall health.

  • Negative consequences of Alcoholism can occur following small amounts Alcohol consumed over a long period of time as well as heavy Alcohol consumption during single occasions.
  • Commonest medical conditions seen in individuals addicted to alcohol include, Cardiomyopathy (Stretching and weakening of the heart muscle), Arrhythmias (Irregular heart beat), Stroke, High blood pressure, Steatosis or fatty liver, Alcoholic hepatitis, Fibrosis, Cirrhosis, Inflammation of the pancreatic tissue resulting in Pancreatitis, Cancers in the Mouth, esophagus, throat, liver and breast and weakening of the immunity system increasing the vulnerability to various infections and inflammation.
  • Earlier, the recommended range of alcohol was accepted to be less than 14 units per week for males and less than 7 units per week for females.
  • According to latest UK guidelines both females and males are advised stick to less than 14 units of Alcohol per week. • This concept of Alcohol consumption is not encouraged at all but individuals who have got addicted to the effect can at least get subjected to lesser risk by following this advice.
  • Different types of Alcohol come to the market in different sizes and strengths so a ‘UNIT’ describes how strong your drink is. 1 unit of Alcohol=10ml of Pure Alcohol
  • In some countries, 6 pints of average strength beer or 6, 175ml glasses of average strength wine can also be considered as a Unit.

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